Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

 

Dr. Louis C. Roudanez  (1823 – 1890)

Louis Charles Roudanez (1823-1870) founded one of the first black daily newspapers for Blacks in the U.S in New Orleans, Louisiana.  (The first Black Newspaper published by a black person was Freedom’s Journal in 1827).  Roudanez used the publication to advocate for the abolition of slavery, voting rights for all, desegregation, and land ownership rights for those formerly enslaved.  Roudanez was also an accomplished physician respected by both blacks and whites in his community.   

During the 1800s the city of New Orleans was very different from the rest of the country. New Orleans was home to a large number of free black Creoles (free people of color of French or Spanish descent and mixed heritage).  Creoles enjoyed privileges that were not given to slaves or even most free blacks.  Creoles comprised about ten percent of the black population in Louisiana.  They were typically affluent, educated, and often business owners.  Many used their affluence to advocate for abolition and civil rights.  Continue reading “Dr. Louis C. Roudanez:  Physician, Journalist & Activist”