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Black History: Special Delivery!!

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Black hisotry

Bravo To This Mother & Her Creativity In Teaching Black History!

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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Ava Rogers as Madame CJ Walker ( The first black female millionaire in America) Image Credit: Forharriet.com

6 Year old Ava Rogers is learning about Black History in such a creative and powerful way! Her mother selects women who have made an impact on history and Ava does a photo shoot dressed up as these women! 

The images are striking and they are a beautiful way to teach a child about the legacy and impact of Black women!  Bravo to this mother-daughter duo!! Read the full article and check out the photos at forharriet.com

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LITTLE KNOWN FACTS AND QUOTES FROM THE LIFE OF SOJOURNER TRUTH

Black History: Special Delivery!!

 

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Sojourner Truth (circa 1870)

 

Many are familiar with the activism of Sojourner Truth as an abolitionist and suffragist.  Here a few facts you may not know about Sojourner Truth:

She was born into slavery in approximately 1797 in New York. Her birth name was Isabella Baumfree. She was later sold at the age of 9 along with a flock of sheep for $100.

Continue reading “LITTLE KNOWN FACTS AND QUOTES FROM THE LIFE OF SOJOURNER TRUTH”

13 HONEST, Books About Slavery To Share With Your Children (Courtesy of Huffington Post)

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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Huffington Post writer Claire Fallon shares recommendations on 13 books for children that discuss slavery with age appropriate candor and honesty.  With Scholastic Publishers recently pulling a children’s book that misrepresented slavery, this list is very timely.  It’s very likely that the issue of slavery is not being fully unpacked at many schools. These books could be a great resource for discussion.

As parents we are our children’s first teachers!  Click here  to view the list of books.

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The Colored Female’s Free Produce Society

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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The Colored Female’s Free Produce Society was formed in January 1831 at Philadelphia’s “Mother” Bethel AME Church. The organization was part of the “free produce movement” which encouraged boycotts against the purchase of items produced by slave labor. The movement was launched as a way to fight slavery and sought to encourage the purchasing “produce” (goods and services) from “free” men and women of color who were paid for their labor. The movement was active in the U.S. starting the 1790’s until the end of slavery in the 1860’s.

The free produce movement originated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). In 1830 African American men formed the Colored Free Produce Society of Pennsylvania and then in the 1831 the women’s organization of the same name was founded. As a result, here were some black businesses that began to feature “free” products which were not made with slave labor. However, the free produce organization did not gain substantial momentum. The national association disbanded in 1847. However Philadelphia Quakers continued advocating for the free produce movement until 1856.

Black Mail Trivia: How Long Was The Montgomery Bus Boycott Originally Expected To Last?

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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Black Mail Trivia:  How Long Was The Montgomery Bus Boycott Originally Expected To Last?

a) 1 month    b) 1 year   c) 1 day

Comment and share your answer!  Answer will be posted at 6pm EST.

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Celebrating Our Sisters: The Women Behind The Montgomery Bus Boycott

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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December 5, 2015 marked 60 years since the start of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. With 75-80% of bus riders in Montgomery being African American, the economic impact of the boycott was devastating. During the boycott, approximately 325 private vehicles picked up thousands of passengers on a daily basis from 43 dispatch stations and 42 pick up sites from 5am-8pm. Crippled economically, the city of Montgomery was forced to desegregate its bus system. Many are familiar with the efforts of the Montgomery Improvement Association in overseeing the boycott. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was its first president. However, many may be unaware of the critical role that the Women’s Political Council played in launching the boycott.

The Women’s Political Council (WPC) was founded in 1946 by Mary Fair Burks, a professor at Alabama State College. Burks launched the organization after she was arrested due to a traffic dispute involving a white woman. The purpose of the organization was to educate blacks in Montgomery on their constitutional rights and increase voter registration among blacks. Within in one week, Burks recruited 40 women to join the organization. Burks was the organization’s first president. The Women’s Political Council became very active in advocating for civil rights. By the 1950’s the organization had approximately 300 members, all of whom were registered voters (which was an impressive accomplishment for women at that time).

Jo Ann Gibson Robinson, a professor at Alabama State College became president in 1950. She focused the efforts of the organization on addressing discrimination on city buses. WPC met a number of times with local city officials in Montgomery in 1954 and 1955, to no avail. WPC had actually been contemplating a boycott of the Montgomery City bus line for several years (even before the arrest of Rosa Parks.) After Rosa Parks was arrested on December 1, 1955, WPC decided to call for a boycott. The WPC distributed 50,000 fliers that read, The Women’s Political Council will not wait for Mrs. Parks’ consent to call for a boycott of city buses. On Dec. 2, 1955, the women of Montgomery will call for a boycott to take place on Monday, Dec. 5.”

On December 5, 1956, the Supreme Court ruled that segregation on public buses was illegal; thus ending the 381 day bus boycott. The WPC continued to work in advocating for the civil rights of blacks. The tireless efforts of this group of women deserves to be celebrated.

Check out some of our recent posts:

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Ever Wonder What Happened To The Montgomery, AL Bus Rosa Parks Boarded on December 1, 1955?

Black History: Special Delivery!!

montgomery bus boycott

Black Mail Fast Fact: The actual bus that Rosa Parks rode on December 1, 1955 (which helped launch the Montgomery Bus Boycott) sat in a field for 30 years in Alabama before it was restored to its original condition. The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan bought the bus through an auction for $492,000 in 2001 and then had it restored at an additional cost of $300,000 The restoration took place in Southfield, MI and was paid for by government grants (Save America’s Treasures Grant). The bus remains on display at The Henry Ford Museum

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Guess Who? Name The 2 Men In This Photo.

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Al Sharpton and James Brown

Guess Who?  Comment and share the names of the individuals in this picture.  Answer will be posted at 6pm EST.

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True peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice. – Martin Luther King, Jr.

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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True peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice.
– Martin Luther King, Jr.

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