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Dr. Louis C. Roudanez:  Physician, Journalist & Activist

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

 

Dr. Louis C. Roudanez  (1823 – 1890)

Louis Charles Roudanez (1823-1870) founded one of the first black daily newspapers for Blacks in the U.S in New Orleans, Louisiana.  (The first Black Newspaper published by a black person was Freedom’s Journal in 1827).  Roudanez used the publication to advocate for the abolition of slavery, voting rights for all, desegregation, and land ownership rights for those formerly enslaved.  Roudanez was also an accomplished physician respected by both blacks and whites in his community.   

During the 1800s the city of New Orleans was very different from the rest of the country. New Orleans was home to a large number of free black Creoles (free people of color of French or Spanish descent and mixed heritage).  Creoles enjoyed privileges that were not given to slaves or even most free blacks.  Creoles comprised about ten percent of the black population in Louisiana.  They were typically affluent, educated, and often business owners.  Many used their affluence to advocate for abolition and civil rights.  Continue reading “Dr. Louis C. Roudanez:  Physician, Journalist & Activist”

David Walker: Abolitionist And Pioneer of Black Nationalism & Black Power

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

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David Walker

 

David Walker (1785-1830), was the son of an enslaved father and a free black mother. Because his mother was free, Walker was also considered a free citizen. His freedom, however, did not shield him from witnessing firsthand the injustices of slavery. On one occasion, Walker witnessed an enslaved boy who was forced to whip his mother until she died. This experience and others throughout his life rallied him to become an activist and an abolitionist. As an adult, Walker settled in Boston, MA. Though Boston was a free city in the North, discrimination was still very prevalent there. Walker opened a clothing store in Boston in the 1820’s. He also began to associate with other black activists and abolitionists and became a writer for the first African American Newspaper in the U.S. “Freedom’s Journal”. Walker was also involved with the Underground Railroad providing clothing to those trying to escape slavery.

His pamphlet, “Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World” was published in 1829. His target audience were those enslaved in the south. Continue reading “David Walker: Abolitionist And Pioneer of Black Nationalism & Black Power”

Freedom’s Journal: The 1st African American Owned & Operated Newspaper

Black History: Special Delivery!!

freedoms journal 

Freedom’s Journal was the first African American owned and operated newspaper in the United States. It was a 4 column publication that was printed, weekly on Fridays. The publication was started by John Russwurm and Samuel Cornish in 1827 in New York City. The paper featured foreign and domestic news, editorials, biographies, births, deaths and advertisements from the local community. The paper openly decried the ills of slavery, discrimination and other issues of concern within the African American community. The publication was strategic in its efforts to combat the negative stereotypes of blacks published in white-owned newspapers which openly supported slavery and mistreatment of blacks. 
Continue reading “Freedom’s Journal: The 1st African American Owned & Operated Newspaper”

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