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Black History: Special Delivery!!

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civil rights act

1963 – MLK LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


On April 16, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. penned his historic letter from a jail in Birmingham, AL. He initially wrote the letter in the margins of a newspaper, from his jail cell.  

King was intentionally arrested to help garner support for his work in the city.  The letter was written in response to criticism he received from white clergy in Birmingham who openly challenged his approach to fighting segregation through, protests, boycotts, and non violence.  The clergy criticizing King felt that he should operate within the confines of the law to accomplish his goals.  There were also those both black and white that felt King was stirring up trouble that could hinder progress.  King was also criticized for being an “outsider” who was stirring up trouble in the community.  

King eloquently articulated in the letter “why we can’t wait.” In honor of the historic letter, we are sharing two of our favorite quotes contained in the letter. These quotes still ring true today!!  To read the letter in its entirety click here.




Queens!!

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


The black women in this slide show are TRUE ROYALTY!  They should inspire us all!  They are diverse in their pursuits and chosen paths.  If you don’t know who they are…….It’s time to do some research and learn about their accomplishments!  

How African Americans Ended Up Supporting The Democratic Party

Black History: Special Delivery!!

dem repub

Dating back just one hundred years ago, the vast majority of African Americans were Republicans and not Democrats. The Republican Party was the “Party of Lincoln” the party that enacted the Emancipation Proclamation and supported Reconstruction.  Many blacks voted Republican following the Civil War through the first part of the 20th century.  Also at that time, most of the white politicians who supported segregation and governed the south were Democrats.  The Democratic Party did not officially open its doors to blacks until 1924 when they were allowed to attend the Democratic convention.  The majority of blacks at the time lived in the South, where they often prevented from even voting at all.  Starting slowly, but peaking in the 1960’s and going forward, blacks have shifted their loyalty to the Democratic Party.  The events of the civil rights movement were a catalyst for blacks to leave the Republican Party in droves.

Prior to the 1960’s, one of the initial shifts of blacks to the Democratic Party occurred during the Great Depression which lasted from 1929-1939. The Roosevelt presidential administration and its policies to bring jobs and assistance to the nations impoverished citizens made the Democratic Party very attractive to black who were experiencing the crushing blow of poverty.  Despite these gains, many blacks continued to stay affiliated with the Republican Party.  Not until Harry Truman received 77% of the black vote in 1948 did many blacks report they thought of themselves as Democrats.  This could be, due in part, to Truman issuing orders to desegregate the military.  He also issued an executive order to address racial bias in federal employment.  As late as 1960 approximately 2/3 of African Americans were affiliated with the Democratic Party.  Today the number is close to 90%.  Another major factor which contributed to the mass exodus from the Republic Party by blacks was the political agenda of US Senator and presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. Goldwater was a 1964 Republican presidential nominee.  He was a 5 term US Senator from Arizona at the time of his nomination for president by the Republican Party against Lyndon Johnson.  Continue reading “How African Americans Ended Up Supporting The Democratic Party”

The Black Codes: A Continuation of Unequal Treatment After The Civil War

 Black History: Special Delivery!!

 

Black Codes.png

 

The 13th Amendment ended slavery. However, Southern whites quickly found a way to attempt to control the freedom of blacks. They did so through the Black Codes. The codes continued to perpetuate a system of unequal treatment. Continue reading “The Black Codes: A Continuation of Unequal Treatment After The Civil War”

Whose proposal that Congress consider civil rights legislation culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

Civil Rights Trivia: Test Your Knowledge
Civil Rights Trivia: Test Your Knowledge

Whose proposal that Congress consider civil rights legislation culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

A)Martin Luther King, Jr.

B)John F. Kennedy

C)Lyndon Johnson

D)Dwight Eisenhower

Answer will be posted at 6pm EST

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