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Civil Rights Movement

Mahalia Jackson: Serious About Securing The Bag!!

Black History: Special Delivery!!

“If you want me to sing this Christmas song with the feeling and the meaning, you better see if you can locate that check.”
-Mahalia Jackson

Mahaila Jackson (1927-1971) is celebrated as one of the greatest gospel singers of all time. She is referred to as “The Queen Of Gospel”. As a child, she shared a small “shotgun” house with 13 people. Raised by an aunt after the death of her mother, Jackson quit school in 4th grade to help out at home. Her amazing vocal skills were evident even when she was a young child. She moved to Chicago at age 16 looking for better opportunities. Instead, she found only low-income domestic work. While in Chicago she joined Greater Salem Baptist Church and began touring with the Johnson Brothers as a “fish and bread” singer (singing for donations). She would later sell 10 cent tickets for her performances and also found work singing at funerals and revivals. She promised to live a pure life and not use her vocal skills for secular entertainment….a promise she kept. Continue reading “Mahalia Jackson: Serious About Securing The Bag!!”

MLK: “A Father We Have Yet To Bury”

Black History: Special Delivery!!

On April 3, 2018, Dr. Bernice King and her siblings took part in a service at Mason Temple Church in Memphis, TN to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination which occurred on April 4, 1968. The last public speech given by King was at Mason Temple on April 3, 1968. Bernice King comments on the trauma and grief she and her siblings still experience even as adults. …..50 years later. Not only was Dr.

King assassinated, but so was King’s mother, Alberta King who was shot and killed while playing the organ at a church in 1974. King’s brother Rev. Alfred Williams died from drowning in 1969. Many felt the “accidental drowning” may not have been an accident. Alfred King was also very active in the civil rights movement and worked closely with his brother.

Bernice King’s words in commemorating the 50th anniversary of her father’s assassination, are both poignant and moving as she reflects on experiencing the grief and trauma of the father that they “have yet bury“. The grief and trauma of these experiences is still present with them……… 50 years later.

Click on the link below to view an excerpt of Bernice King’s comments:

“Mountain Top”: MLK’s Last Speech Before His Assassination

Black History: Special Delivery!!

MLK QUOTE: “Be concerned about your brother……either we go up together or we go down together.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

MLK made this quote on, April 3, 1968, during what would be his last speech at Mason Temple Pentecostal Church in Memphis, TN. King was in town to support black sanitation workers who were seeking better pay and working conditions. In this famous “mountain top” speech, some felt King seemed to be keenly aware that his life might be cut short.

On April 4, 1968, King was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel. Originally, James Earl Ray was arrested and convicted of King’s murder. He later recanted his confession. However many felt Ray was not King’s killer and that there was a conspiracy between the US government and the mafia to murder King. An initial ruling found that conspiracy was proved. However, the ruling was later dismissed by the Department of Justice due to a lack of evidence.

Check out the video link to view an excerpt from this historic speech:

Sources:

http://www.thekingcenter.org/assassination-conspiracy-trial

https://www.history.com/topics/black-history/martin-luther-king-jr-assassination

Jimmie Lee Jackson:  His Death Inspired The Selma To Montgomery March “Bloody Sunday”

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Jimmie lee jackson
Jimmie Lee Jackson (1938 – 1965)

Jimmie Lee Jackson (1938 – 1965) was born in Marion, Alabama. In February, 1965, Jackson was a 26 year old Vietnam veteran, a father, and the youngest deacon at his church. He worked as a laborer. Jackson was also an active supporter of voting rights. He had been working with other activists to advocate for voting rights in Selma and Marion, Alabama. When Dr. Martin Luther King arrived in Selma in 1965, Jackson had already attempted to register to vote several times. Dr. King decided to bring the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to Selma because he was concerned about the police brutality being experienced by non-violent black activists. He hoped to get the attention of national media outlets to the violence that was occurring. He hoped this attention would put pressure on President Lyndon Johnson to pass voting rights legislation.

Continue reading “Jimmie Lee Jackson:  His Death Inspired The Selma To Montgomery March “Bloody Sunday””

MLK Sanitized To Satisfy……

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Powerful quote from weeklysift.com! Dr. King’s legacy is being both sanitized and euthanized!

We celebrate his birthday and make anniversaries of noteworthy events in his life, but by their very veneration the Powers That Be have sanitized Dr. King’s memory, removing everything they find threatening.” -Weeklysift.com

Source:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/weeklysift.com/2013/09/02/mlk-sanitized-for-their-protection/amp/

1956 Christmas Fire Bombing

Black History: Special Delivery!!

On Christmas Day 1956, the home of civil rights activist, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth was fire bombed by the KKK. Shuttlesworth sought to test the recent supreme court ruling to desegregate public transportation that resulted from the Montgomery Bus Boycott. His home was destroyed by the blast. The church also sustained damage. After the blast, he commented, “God made me dynamite proof. ”

Undeterred, he boarded public buses on December 26 and was arrested along with 20 other blacks. Shuttlesworth died at the age of 89 in 2011.

 

Source:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.biography.com/.amp/people/fred-shuttlesworth-21389361

 

 

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