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Discrimination

1956 Christmas Fire Bombing

Black History: Special Delivery!!

On Christmas Day 1956, the home of civil rights activist, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth was fire bombed by the KKK. Shuttlesworth sought to test the recent supreme court ruling to desegregate public transportation that resulted from the Montgomery Bus Boycott. His home was destroyed by the blast. The church also sustained damage. After the blast, he commented, “God made me dynamite proof. ”

Undeterred, he boarded public buses on December 26 and was arrested along with 20 other blacks. Shuttlesworth died at the age of 89 in 2011.

 

Source:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.biography.com/.amp/people/fred-shuttlesworth-21389361

 

 

Katrina Adams: 1st African American President of U.S. Tennis Association

Black History: Special Delivery!!

We’ve seen the headlines about Sloane Stephens defeating Venus Williams to win the U.S. Open. It’s great to see another wave of African American women excelling in the sport.

Many may not know the CEO of the United States Tennis Association (USTA) is also an African American woman. Katrina Adams has been at the helm since 2015. She is USTA’s first African American CEO and its youngest CEO in the 135 year history of the organization.

An accomplished, tennis pro, Adams began playing tennis in Chicago in 1975 at the age of six. She played tennis in college for Northwestern University before launching her 12 year professional career. She also spent several years as a tennis coach.

Adams is proud of the progress that African American women have made in tennis. She would like to see greater participation in the sport by African American boys and Latino youth.

Sources:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/amp/usta-president-katrina-adams-bringing-diversity-u-s-open-n799411

https://www.usta.com/en/home/about-usta/usta-leadership/national/katrina-adams.html

If you think only Latinos are undocumented, THINK AGAIN!

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Some may think that President Trump’s announcement to rescind the DACA Program doesn’t impact black people. As a group of citizens that knows what it’s like to be marginalized and discriminated against, we should be standing in solidarity with any other groups that are facing systemic racism and discrimination. We also need to educate ourselves on how immigration will impact ALL communities, particularly communities of color.

What Would MLK Say?

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Wonder what MLK would say about DACA being rescinded? Tell us what you think Black Mail Readers!

1963 – MLK LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


On April 16, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. penned his historic letter from a jail in Birmingham, AL. He initially wrote the letter in the margins of a newspaper, from his jail cell.  

King was intentionally arrested to help garner support for his work in the city.  The letter was written in response to criticism he received from white clergy in Birmingham who openly challenged his approach to fighting segregation through, protests, boycotts, and non violence.  The clergy criticizing King felt that he should operate within the confines of the law to accomplish his goals.  There were also those both black and white that felt King was stirring up trouble that could hinder progress.  King was also criticized for being an “outsider” who was stirring up trouble in the community.  

King eloquently articulated in the letter “why we can’t wait.” In honor of the historic letter, we are sharing two of our favorite quotes contained in the letter. These quotes still ring true today!!  To read the letter in its entirety click here.




Bell Hooks Quote

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


“Usually when people talk about the strength of black women…. they ignore the reality that to be strong in the face of oppression is not the same as overcoming oppression, that endurance is not to be confused with transformation.”
-Bell Hooks


Louise Stokes & Tidye Pickett: 1st African American Women To Qualify For U.S. Olympic Team

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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Tidye Pickett (back row, far right), Louise Stokes, (3rd from the left-back row)

Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee University) has the distinction  of having one of the first women’s track teams in the United States.  The team was started in 1929.  3 years later, two African American women,  Louise Stokes (1913-1978) and Tidye Pickett (1914-1986) qualified for the 1932 Olympics in track and field.     (Neither Stokes nor Pickett attended Tuskegee).   They traveled to the Olympics with the team but were not allowed to compete because of their race.  Replaced by 2 white teammates, Pickett and Stokes watched from the stands as their team competed.

Continue reading “Louise Stokes & Tidye Pickett: 1st African American Women To Qualify For U.S. Olympic Team”

John B. McClendon, Jr: Creator Of The Fast Break, Zone Press, And 4 Corners Offense

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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John B. McClendon, Jr. (1915 – 1999)

 

John B. McLendon, Jr. (1915-1999) was trailblazing African American basketball coach.  He is also recognized as the first African American basketball coach at a predominately white university and the first African American coach of a professional sports team.

McClendon, Jr.’s attended Sumner High School in Kansas City.  While an all around athlete, McClendon, , Jr., did not play basketball while in high school.  He was born in Hiawatha, KS and graduated from University of Kansas with a degree in physical education.  He studied basketball at Kansas and was trained by the creator of the sport, Dr. James Naismith. McClendon Jr. was not allowed to play of the varsity team at the University of Kansas because he was black.  However, he would go on to build an impressive career as a coach winning 8 CIAA (Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association) championships.  McClendon, Jr. also invented several aspects of the game including the fast break, zone press, and four corners offense. Continue reading “John B. McClendon, Jr: Creator Of The Fast Break, Zone Press, And 4 Corners Offense”

Diane Nash – Unsung Hero Of The Civil Rights Movement

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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A native of Chicago, IL, Diane Nash (1938-) was one of the pioneering forces behind the Civil Rights movement. Nash and many other women  were champions of the movement.  She became active in the movement in 1959 as a new student at Fisk University in Nashville, TN.  While at Fisk she would encounter the harsh realities of segregation and prejudice that were previously unknown to her.  In 1959 she attended a workshop focused on non-violent protesting. She would quickly become a respected leader of Nashville’s “sit in” movement.  Her efforts were instrumental in organizing the first successful campaign to end segregation of lunch counters.  This effort engaged hundreds of black and white college students as volunteers.  She was also one of the founders of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  SNCC would play a major role in the civil rights movement by engaging young college students in civil rights activism.  These efforts were successful and in 1960, Nashville became first southern city to desegregate lunch counters.  Continue reading “Diane Nash – Unsung Hero Of The Civil Rights Movement”

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