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1963 – MLK LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


On April 16, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. penned his historic letter from a jail in Birmingham, AL. He initially wrote the letter in the margins of a newspaper, from his jail cell.  

King was intentionally arrested to help garner support for his work in the city.  The letter was written in response to criticism he received from white clergy in Birmingham who openly challenged his approach to fighting segregation through, protests, boycotts, and non violence.  The clergy criticizing King felt that he should operate within the confines of the law to accomplish his goals.  There were also those both black and white that felt King was stirring up trouble that could hinder progress.  King was also criticized for being an “outsider” who was stirring up trouble in the community.  

King eloquently articulated in the letter “why we can’t wait.” In honor of the historic letter, we are sharing two of our favorite quotes contained in the letter. These quotes still ring true today!!  To read the letter in its entirety click here.




Malcolm X Quote: “That’s Not A Chip On My Shoulder. That’s Your Foot On My Neck”

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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A powerful quote from Malcolm X!!

“That’s Not A Chip On My Shoulder.  That’s Your Foot On My Neck” – Malcolm X

Diane Nash – Unsung Hero Of The Civil Rights Movement

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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A native of Chicago, IL, Diane Nash (1938-) was one of the pioneering forces behind the Civil Rights movement. Nash and many other women  were champions of the movement.  She became active in the movement in 1959 as a new student at Fisk University in Nashville, TN.  While at Fisk she would encounter the harsh realities of segregation and prejudice that were previously unknown to her.  In 1959 she attended a workshop focused on non-violent protesting. She would quickly become a respected leader of Nashville’s “sit in” movement.  Her efforts were instrumental in organizing the first successful campaign to end segregation of lunch counters.  This effort engaged hundreds of black and white college students as volunteers.  She was also one of the founders of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  SNCC would play a major role in the civil rights movement by engaging young college students in civil rights activism.  These efforts were successful and in 1960, Nashville became first southern city to desegregate lunch counters.  Continue reading “Diane Nash – Unsung Hero Of The Civil Rights Movement”

Quote:   Racial “Superiority is a mere ‘PIGMENT’ Of The Imagination”

Black History:  Special Delivery!!



Racial superiority is a mere “PIGMENT” of the imagination.  

~Author Unknown

Charles L. Reason: 1st African American To Teach At A Predominately White College

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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 Charles L. Reason (1818 – 1864)was active in efforts to gain voting rights for black men. Reason believed strongly that industrial education was very important for blacks to gain their freedom. He also valued classical education as well and started a teachers training college in New York City. Reason and Charles B. Ray started the Society for The Promotion of Education among Colored Children, a black organization approved by the state legislature to oversee schools for blacks in New York City.In 1849, the mostly white Free Mission College (renamed New York Central College) in Courtland County, NY hired Reason as an instructor making him the first African American to teach at a predominately white college. Continue reading “Charles L. Reason: 1st African American To Teach At A Predominately White College”

106 Year Old Virginia McLaurin Visits President Obama At The White House

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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106 Year old Virginia McLaurin never thought she would live to see a black president…..Let alone get a chance to meet him.  This White House video says it all.  Virginia was dancing with pride and joy. She was born less than 50 years after the Emancipation Proclamation and the end of the Civil War. She has lived through segregation, wars, and many other triumphs and tragedies!  Check out this White House video!

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Ever Wonder What Happened To The Montgomery, AL Bus Rosa Parks Boarded on December 1, 1955?

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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Black Mail Fast Fact: The actual bus that Rosa Parks rode on December 1, 1955 (which helped launch the Montgomery Bus Boycott) sat in a field for 30 years in Alabama before it was restored to its original condition. The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan bought the bus through an auction for $492,000 in 2001 and then had it restored at an additional cost of $300,000 The restoration took place in Southfield, MI and was paid for by government grants (Save America’s Treasures Grant). The bus remains on display at The Henry Ford Museum

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60th Anniversary Of The Montgomery Bus Boycott – December 1, 2015

 Black History: Special Delivery!!

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1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott – Blacks In Montgomery Walking To Work To Avoid Taking The Bus.

 I’d See The Bus Pass Every Day……..

But To Me, That Was A Way of Life…..

We Had No Choice But To Accept What Was The Custom.

The Bus Was Among The First Ways I Realized There Was A Black World And A White World.

-Rosa Parks

What proverbial “bus” (injustice/discrimination/racism) is passing us by (on a daily basis)……that we are just accepting as a ‘way of life’?

Check out some of our recent posts:

Carl Brashear: 1st African American and 1st Amputee To Become A Master Diver In The U.S. Navy

Jackie Robinson: 1st Black Player In Major League Baseball Court Martialed In 1942

True peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice. – Martin Luther King, Jr.

White Shoes Photo Series

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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Over My Dead Body From the “White Shoes” Photo Series, 2013 By Nona Faustine

Learn more about the “White Shoes” Photography series by Nona Faustine. The imagery is POWERFUL!!

Nona has chosen to display herself in naked at various locations associated with slavery in New York.  She chose to pose nude to highlight the vulnerability and inhumane treatment of slaves.  In the photos, she is nude with the exception of wearing white shoes. Nona indicates that “white shoes” represent the “white patriarchy” from which she says we have been unable to escape.  This is a courageous work!

Click on the link below to read the full need article:

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2015/aug/05/the-scars-of-america-nude-artist-slavery-sites-nona-faustine

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