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Black History: Special Delivery!!

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Voting Rights Act 1965

Make Your Vote Count!

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Some people are counting on you to vote; while others are counting on you NOT to vote.
How will you make your vote count?

VOTE BABY VOTE!!!

Jimmie Lee Jackson:  His Death Inspired The Selma To Montgomery March “Bloody Sunday”

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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Jimmie Lee Jackson (1938 – 1965)

Jimmie Lee Jackson (1938 – 1965) was born in Marion, Alabama. In February, 1965, Jackson was a 26 year old Vietnam veteran, a father, and the youngest deacon at his church. He worked as a laborer. Jackson was also an active supporter of voting rights. He had been working with other activists to advocate for voting rights in Selma and Marion, Alabama. When Dr. Martin Luther King arrived in Selma in 1965, Jackson had already attempted to register to vote several times. Dr. King decided to bring the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to Selma because he was concerned about the police brutality being experienced by non-violent black activists. He hoped to get the attention of national media outlets to the violence that was occurring. He hoped this attention would put pressure on President Lyndon Johnson to pass voting rights legislation.

Continue reading “Jimmie Lee Jackson:  His Death Inspired The Selma To Montgomery March “Bloody Sunday””

Diane Nash – Unsung Hero Of The Civil Rights Movement

Black History: Special Delivery!!

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A native of Chicago, IL, Diane Nash (1938-) was one of the pioneering forces behind the Civil Rights movement. Nash and many other women  were champions of the movement.  She became active in the movement in 1959 as a new student at Fisk University in Nashville, TN.  While at Fisk she would encounter the harsh realities of segregation and prejudice that were previously unknown to her.  In 1959 she attended a workshop focused on non-violent protesting. She would quickly become a respected leader of Nashville’s “sit in” movement.  Her efforts were instrumental in organizing the first successful campaign to end segregation of lunch counters.  This effort engaged hundreds of black and white college students as volunteers.  She was also one of the founders of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  SNCC would play a major role in the civil rights movement by engaging young college students in civil rights activism.  These efforts were successful and in 1960, Nashville became first southern city to desegregate lunch counters.  Continue reading “Diane Nash – Unsung Hero Of The Civil Rights Movement”

All Roads Lead To The “Sugar Shack” on November 8th!

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


The Man Behind Abigail Fisher & The University of Texas Court Case

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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Edward Blum (left) and Abigail Fisher (right)

Abigail Fisher, the 25 year old woman who recently filed suit against the University of Texas because was denied did not act alone. Fisher’s suit alleges that she was denied admission because she was white. (Never mind that she didn’t have the grades or test scores to get in.)  Fisher was carefully selected by Edward Blum. Blum has, over the years selected plaintiffs to bring lawsuits designed to weaken civil rights advances. Blum is not a lawyer but he is serious about rolling back the clock on civil rights legal advancements. Continue reading “The Man Behind Abigail Fisher & The University of Texas Court Case”

Selma To Montgomery Quiz – Answers

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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Earlier today, we invited our Black Mail Readers to take a quiz on the Selma To Montgomery March. As promised here are answers!
1)T or F: March on Selma was in support of passing the Civil Rights Act.  FALSE
2)T or F: March on Selma was organized by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  FALSE
3)T or F: The NAACP & SCLC organized the marches  FALSE
4)Bonus Question: How many miles was the march from Selma to Montgomery A)17 miles B)45 miles C)54 miles  ANSWER IS C – 54 MILES

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