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Black History: Special Delivery!!

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African American poet

When The “Public” You Collides With The “Private” You….

Black History: Special Delivery!!

A powerful quote from our Black Mail founder, Enid Gaddis.

Something for my sisters to ponder……..

“When the public you collides with the private you……. My dear sister, whatcha gonna do?”

Stop hiding behind true lies.

Watcha gonna do when your sleeping giants rise?

The cape is ripped.

Your wings are clipped.

That shiny halo was just a disguise.

Whatcha gonna do when you sleeping giants rise.

Enid Gaddis ©2017 All rights reserved.

We must not “lose” or “loose” ourselves to be anything less or more than who we actually are. Sometimes, being your authentic self is a radical and defiant response to the demands that society and individuals will place upon you.

Remember you are wonderful. But you are not Wonder Woman. So excel at being your own brand of wonderful.

You are beautiful, but not Beyonce beautiful. Excel at being your own brand of beautiful.

Revel in, and relish your own complicated, complex, imperfect, got-it-going-on, one-of-kind, phenomenal self!

-Enid Gaddis, Black Mail

Remembering Maya Angelou & MLK

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


Today we remember the incomparable Maya Angelou.  She would have been 89 today (4/4/17).  Many don’t know that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on her  40th birthday birthday in 1968. After his assassination, she refused to celebrate her birthday.  Instead she would send flowers to King’s widow, Coretta Scott King. 

Ironically before Dr. King’s death, he had asked, Maya Angelou to travel with him and visit churches to raise money for his efforts to support the poor. Angelou agreed, but stated she could not begin until after her birthday.  A promise she would never get the chance to fulfill.  She was notified of his death while preparing for her birthday party.

Remembering The Incomparable Maya Angelou: Gone To Soon

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

 Maya Angelou was born, “Marguerite Johnson” on April 4, 1928. She was nicknamed Maya (meaning “my sister”) by her brother. Angelou grew up in Stamps, Arkansas and as a child, was raised by her grandmother. At the age of 7, while visiting her mother in Chicago, Angelou was sexually molested by her mother’s boyfriend. Angelou was ashamed to tell an adult, so she told her brother. She found out later that one of her uncles killed her attacker. Angelou felt that her words had killed the man and as a result did not speak for 5 year until she was 13. Angelou is the mother of one son named, Guy who she had at age 16.  Angelou led a colorful and storied life. Though she never went to college, she was the recipient of more than 50 honorary degrees. Continue reading “Remembering The Incomparable Maya Angelou: Gone To Soon”

Hey Black Child – Useni Eugene Perkins Poem Recited By 3 Year Old Pe’Tehn Raighn-Kem

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

Peteh Raighn Kem
Pe’Tehn Raighn-Kem

Some of our Black Mail readers may be familiar with the poem, “Hey Black Child” by Useni Eugene Perkins.  Poem is often attributed to Counter Cullen. But Perkins authored the piece to be performed in a play, The Black Fairy. Check out 3 year old Pe’Teh Raighn-Kem’s rendition!

 

Hey Black Child

Hey Black Child

Do you know who you are
Who you really are
Do you know you can be
What you want to be
If you try to be
What you can be

Hey black child
Do you know where you are going
Where your really going
Do you know you can learn
What you want to learn
If you try to learn
What you can learn

Hey black child
Do you know you are strong
I mean really strong
Do you know you can do
What you want to do
If you try to do
What you can do

Hey Black Child
Be what you can be
Learn what you must learn
Do what you can do
And tomorrow your nation
Will be what you want it to be

By Useni Eugene Perkins
*******

Did you miss yesterday’s post?  Click here to learn about Hugh Mulzac, the first African American Merchant Marine Shipmaster.

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