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Bisa Butler: The Artistry Displayed Through Her Quilts Will Amaze You!!

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Electric-Relaxation

Artist Bisa Bulter brings together artistry and creativity through her quilts.  Made from bold and vibrant patterns her quilts portray people from all walks of life. Bisa Bulter was born in Orange, NJ. She was the youngest of four siblings. Her artistic talents became apparent early. At age four she won a blue ribbon in the Plainfield Sidewalk art competition. At age five, she was named the “artist of the month” at her nursery school. Continue reading “Bisa Butler: The Artistry Displayed Through Her Quilts Will Amaze You!!”

Alexander Augusta:  1st Black Surgeon In The U.S. Army

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Alexander Augusta
Alexander Augusta (1825 – 1890)

Alexander Augusta (1825 – 1890) was born in Norfolk Virginia.  He began his medical studies under the supervision of private tutors.  He then applied for admission at the University of Pennsylvania but was denied.  Still, a Professor William Gibson, who was very impressed with Augusta began teaching him privately.  In 1847, Augusta married Native American woman, Mary O. Burgoin.  In 1856 he was admitted to the College Of The University of Toronto. He would eventually receive his Bachelors of Medicine degree from Trinity Medical College.

Augusta went on to establish a thriving private practice in Canada.  He was also hired as the head of Toronto City Hospital.  Just prior to the start of the Civil War,  he returned to the U.S. and enlisted in the U.S. Army.  He was the first of eight black officers to be commissioned during the Civil War and was the first black surgeon in the army.  He was commissioned as a major with the 7th U.S. Colored Troops. At that time, Augusta was the highest ranking black officer.  His high ranking angered some of the white medical personnel who reported to him.  Those individuals wrote President Lincoln and complained.  Lincoln then forced Augusta to take on a leadership role at Freedmen’s Hospital in Washington, D.C.  Augusta was the first African American to lead Freedman’s Hospital.   Continue reading “Alexander Augusta:  1st Black Surgeon In The U.S. Army”

Dr. Euphemia Lofton Haynes – 1st African American Female Ph.D. In Mathematics

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Dr. Euphemia Lofton Haynes (1890 – 1980)

Euphemia Lofton Haynes (1890-1980) was born in Washington, DC.  She received her BA from Smith College and an MA in education from University of Chicago in 1930.  She obtained her Ph.D in Mathematics from Catholic University in 1943.  Her father was Dr. William S. Lofton, a well respected African American dentist.  He also supported many charities and African American businesses financially.  Her mother, Lavinia Day Lofton was very active in the Catholic Church.  Lavinia Lofton held a BA in mathematics and a minor in psychology.

Euphemia married Harold Appo Haynes in 1917.  Harold Haynes was a principal and then deputy superintendent in charge of the “colored” schools in Washington DC.  Dr. Euphemia Haynes taught in the Washington DC’s public schools for forty-seven years.  She was the first female chair of the DC Board of Education and played an integral role in integration of DC schools. She was also a vocal opponent of the “track system” which disproportionately impacted African American students in a negative way.  Under the track system, students were placed in either academic or vocational programs based on their educational achievement early in their education. There was no recourse available to change the “track” if a student’s academic achievement improved or their interests changed. Continue reading “Dr. Euphemia Lofton Haynes – 1st African American Female Ph.D. In Mathematics”

Dr. Clive Callender:  Founder Of The National Minority Organ Tissue Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP)

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clive callender
Dr. Clive Callender (1936 – )

 

Dr. Clive Callender (1936-) is an accomplished medical doctor, educator and pioneer in the field of organ transplantation. He was born in New York, NY.  Callender was placed in foster care as a child and also lived with his father until his stepmother had to be hospitalized.  At that time, Callender moved in with his aunt, “Ella”.  He became very involved with his Aunt’s church, Ebenezer Gospel Tabernacle.  As a result, he wanted to become a medical missionary.  After completing high school, Callender received his B.S. degree in Chemistry and Physiology from Hunter College.  He then attended Meharry Medical College in Nashville, TN where he received his M.D. degree in 1963.  He completed residency programs at Harlem Hospital, Freedmen’s Hospital, and Memorial Hospital For Cancer and Allied Disease.  Following his residency completion, he returned to Howard University Hospital and became chief resident.  In 1969, he became an instructor at Howard University.  In 1970, he served as a medical officer at D.C. General Hospital.  Continue reading “Dr. Clive Callender:  Founder Of The National Minority Organ Tissue Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP)”

Dr. Francis Sumner: 1st African American With Ph.D. In Psychology

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Dr. Francis Sumner (1895-1954)

 

Dr. Francis Sumner (1895-1954) was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. After elementary school, Sumner was home-schooled by his parents. He was able to pass the entrance exam for Lincoln University even without having attended high school.  Because he did not attend high school, Sumner had to pass a written exam in order to be admitted. He passed the exam and began his studies at age 15. He graduated magna cum laude with honors in 1915. He then attended Clark University where he obtained a bachelor of arts in English in 1916. Sumner returned to Clark University to complete his Ph.D in psychology. He was unable to start his doctoral studies due to be drafted into the army during World War I. He re-enrolled after completing military service and graduated with his Ph.D in 1920 at Clark University. Sumner became a professor and also began to publish research.

His first teaching position was Wilberforce University in Ohio. He would later teach at other universities as well. In publishing his research, he encountered many barriers. Many research agencies refused to fund his research because he was black. In publishing articles, Sumner was outspoken in criticism of colleges and universities and their treatment of African American students. He would later go on to become one of the founders of the psychology department at Howard University. He chaired the department from 1928 until his death in 1954

Throughout, Sumner investigated ways to refute racism and bias prevalent in many psychological theories that suggested the inferiority of African Americans.

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Reference

Thomas, R. (2006). “Sumner, Francis Cecil.” African American National Biography, edited by Henry Louis Gates Jr, edited by Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham. Oxford African American Studies Center.

 

http://www.apa.org/pi/oema/resources/ethnicity-health/psychologists/sumner-prosser.aspx 

http://legacy.earlham.edu/~knigher/personal%20biography.htm

TruthBeTold.News: An HBCU Digital Fact Checker

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truth be told

TruthBeTold.News, (formerly HU Insight) is a non-profit website operated by the School of Communications at Howard University. Students in the School of Communications provide fact-checking on issues of interest to the black community. The website has two goals to educate students in journalism techniques as well providing a public service by investigating claims made about the black community. Continue reading “TruthBeTold.News: An HBCU Digital Fact Checker”

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