Search

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Tag

Mississippi Appendectomy

Fannie Lou Hamer Quote

Black History: Special Delivery!! Today we are sharing another thought provoking quote from Fannie Lou Hamer! “….I don’t want you to say, ‘Honey, I’m behind you.’ Well, MOVE. I don’t want you back there. Because you could be 200 miles behind. I want you say, ‘I’m with you’. And we’ll go up this freedom road together. ” -Fannie Lou Hammer Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977) was a voting rights activist and civil rights leader. Much of her activism was concentrated in Mississippi. The youngest of 20 children, Hamer grew up in Sunflower County, MS. Hamer began work with her family sharecropping at the age of six. She is well known for coining of the phrase “Mississippi Appendectomy” after receiving a hysterectomy without her consent our knowledge. At the age of 47, she was hospitalized to remove a tumor. It was at that type that doctors also gave her a hysterectomy without her consent. Click here to read an earlier Black Mail post about the ” Mississippi Appendectomy”. Hamer died in 1977 due to complications from breast cancer and hypertension.

Mississippi Appendectomy: History of Involuntary Sterilization of African American Women

Black History: Special Delivery!!

fannie lou hamer
Fannie Lou Hamer 1917-1977

The term, “Mississippi Appendectomy” was popularized by Civil Rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer. It refers to involuntary sterilization procedures that were performed on African American women. While having surgery to remove a tumor, in 1961 Hamer was given a hysterectomy without her knowledge or consent by a white doctor as a part of the state of Mississippi’s plan to reduce the number of poor blacks in the state. Hysterectomies or tubal ligations were performed on many other poor black women against their will and without their knowledge. Due to rampant discrimination and prejudice there was a belief that certain individuals of color or poor women in general were “unfit” to reproduce.

These forced/coerced sterilizations took place across the country but were considered particularly frequent in the deep south. Poor women, women with physical disabilities, or characteristics for which physicians deemed these women “unfit to reproduce” were often targeted for sterilization. Poor white women and Native Americans were also subjected to these types of coercive sterilization practices. Women outside the U.S. were also subjected to these involuntary sterilization procedures.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: