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Montgomery Bus Boycott

Before The Montgomery Bus Boycott There Was The Baton Rouge Bus Boycott

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Baton Rouge

On June 15, 1953, the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott occurred. It was the first Black bus boycott in in the U.S. Years before the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the black residents of Baton Rouge took a stand against racism and segregation. In 1950, the city began to require all residents to use segregated public bussing. Prior to this, black residents utilized black-owned public transportation and required all residents to use the city’s public transportation which enforced segregated seating. Black residents had to sit at the back half of the bus or stand, even if seats in the “white” section were empty. Black passengers comprised 80% of bus passengers and were fed up with standing up on buses while “white” seats remained empty, particularly after the company had raised fares from ten to fifteen cents in January 1953. Continue reading “Before The Montgomery Bus Boycott There Was The Baton Rouge Bus Boycott”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Cesar Chavez:  Champions For Justice

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cesar chavez

1966 Telegram from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr to Cesar Chavez

Both Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Cesar Chavez became nationally recognized during the 1950s.  King gained acclaim through his involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the support of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.  Chavez gained notoriety for his involvement with organized labor.  He moved up within the Community Service Organization (CSO) and eventually became its national director.  The fight to win union rights for Mexican American farmworkers won the attention and admiration of King.  Chavez later left the organization when he saw the group did not have the resources and resolve to aid in organizing farmworkers in 1958. Continue reading “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Cesar Chavez:  Champions For Justice”

1956 Christmas Fire Bombing

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On Christmas Day 1956, the home of civil rights activist, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth was fire bombed by the KKK. Shuttlesworth sought to test the recent supreme court ruling to desegregate public transportation that resulted from the Montgomery Bus Boycott. His home was destroyed by the blast. The church also sustained damage. After the blast, he commented, “God made me dynamite proof. ”

Undeterred, he boarded public buses on December 26 and was arrested along with 20 other blacks. Shuttlesworth died at the age of 89 in 2011.

 

Source:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.biography.com/.amp/people/fred-shuttlesworth-21389361

 

 

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Rosa Parks!

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Rosa Parks

 

In honor of Rosa Parks birthday, I’m reposting, 10 THINGS YOU PROBABLY DIDNT KNOW ABOUT ROSA PARKS.  She was truly a phenomenal woman!  Many focus on her actions that launched the Montgomery Bus Boycott.  But she was an activist long before that!  She traveled the south on behalf of the NAACP investigating sexual assaults of black women.

Click the link to learn more!

 

Source: 10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Rosa Parks!

Black Mail Trivia Answer: How Long Was The Montgomery Bus Boycott Originally Expected To Last?

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Earlier today, we asked our Black Mail Readers:  How Long Was The Montgomery Bus Boycott Originally Expected To Last?

a) 1 month    b) 1 year   c) 1 day

The answer is:  c) 1 day

The boycott was extended due to the success of the first day and lasted 381 days.

Check out some of our recent posts:

December 5, 1955 – 381 Day Economic Boycott Begins!

Jane Matilda Bolin: 1st Black Female Judge In The United States

26 Children’s Books That Celebrate Black Heroes

Black Mail Trivia: How Long Was The Montgomery Bus Boycott Originally Expected To Last?

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

bus boycott 4

Black Mail Trivia:  How Long Was The Montgomery Bus Boycott Originally Expected To Last?

a) 1 month    b) 1 year   c) 1 day

Comment and share your answer!  Answer will be posted at 6pm EST.

Check out some of our recent posts:

December 5, 1955 – 381 Day Economic Boycott Begins!

Jane Matilda Bolin: 1st Black Female Judge In The United States

26 Children’s Books That Celebrate Black Heroes

Celebrating Our Sisters: The Women Behind The Montgomery Bus Boycott

Black History: Special Delivery!!

bus boycott

December 5, 2015 marked 60 years since the start of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. With 75-80% of bus riders in Montgomery being African American, the economic impact of the boycott was devastating. During the boycott, approximately 325 private vehicles picked up thousands of passengers on a daily basis from 43 dispatch stations and 42 pick up sites from 5am-8pm. Crippled economically, the city of Montgomery was forced to desegregate its bus system. Many are familiar with the efforts of the Montgomery Improvement Association in overseeing the boycott. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was its first president. However, many may be unaware of the critical role that the Women’s Political Council played in launching the boycott.

The Women’s Political Council (WPC) was founded in 1946 by Mary Fair Burks, a professor at Alabama State College. Burks launched the organization after she was arrested due to a traffic dispute involving a white woman. The purpose of the organization was to educate blacks in Montgomery on their constitutional rights and increase voter registration among blacks. Within in one week, Burks recruited 40 women to join the organization. Burks was the organization’s first president. The Women’s Political Council became very active in advocating for civil rights. By the 1950’s the organization had approximately 300 members, all of whom were registered voters (which was an impressive accomplishment for women at that time).

Jo Ann Gibson Robinson, a professor at Alabama State College became president in 1950. She focused the efforts of the organization on addressing discrimination on city buses. WPC met a number of times with local city officials in Montgomery in 1954 and 1955, to no avail. WPC had actually been contemplating a boycott of the Montgomery City bus line for several years (even before the arrest of Rosa Parks.) After Rosa Parks was arrested on December 1, 1955, WPC decided to call for a boycott. The WPC distributed 50,000 fliers that read, The Women’s Political Council will not wait for Mrs. Parks’ consent to call for a boycott of city buses. On Dec. 2, 1955, the women of Montgomery will call for a boycott to take place on Monday, Dec. 5.”

On December 5, 1956, the Supreme Court ruled that segregation on public buses was illegal; thus ending the 381 day bus boycott. The WPC continued to work in advocating for the civil rights of blacks. The tireless efforts of this group of women deserves to be celebrated.

Check out some of our recent posts:

December 5, 1955 – 381 Day Economic Boycott Begins!

Jane Matilda Bolin: 1st Black Female Judge In The United States

26 Children’s Books That Celebrate Black Heroes

December 5, 1955 – 381 Day Economic Boycott Begins!

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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60 years ago today the Montgomery Bus Boycott was launched on December 5, 1955. It was just days after Rosa Parks was arrest for refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger.

Blacks refused to ride the buses. They car pooled and walked to work.  And they did it for 381 Days!! The boycott financially crippled the transit system in Montgomery as blacks represented a large portion of the ridership.

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So while some would like to think hearts were softened and minds were opened; what brought about the change was the ECONOMIC IMPACT.  A disenfranchised, group without much individual power, collectively shut down city finances. 

Keep in mind there we no Twitter, no Facebook, no fax machines or other social media.  The bus was the primary transportation for MANY! Yet they made this huge sacrifice. 

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“People Always Say That I Didn’t Give Up My Seat Because I Was Tired But That Isn’t True…No, The Only Tired I Was, Was Tired Of Giving In” -Rosa Parks

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

Rosa Parks quote

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