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Racism

Racism In Retail (Again)…..

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Retailer H & M recently pulled a photo of a black boy wearing a hoodie with said, “coolest monkey in the jungle“. Not sure how NO ONE thought about how this would be viewed as offensive. The ad has been pulled, but not before social media blasted the retailer. Not surpisingly, the retailer also had some defenders on social media making comments like, “I see a sweet little black boy wearing a sweater with ‘coolest monkey in the jungle. I see nothing else. Hope this helps.
Another said, “Perhaps it was an innocent mistake and no-one even thought that they injected racism into the ad.”

Unfortunately, the disrespect of comparing black people to monkeys has a long standing racist history!

Sources:

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/h-m-slammed-racism-coolest-monkey-jungle-hoodie-article-1.3744160

https://www.google.com/amp/s/m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5a53203be4b003133ec9917a/amp

Revisionist History Reaches An All Time Low….Trump Chief Of Staff Says A ‘Lack Of Compromise’ Led To The Civil War

Black History: Special Delivery!!

In an interview with Fox News today, Trump Chief Of Staff, John Kelly says a “LACK OF ABILITY TO COMPROMISE led to the CIVIL WAR”.

COMPROMISE? Can you really come to a compromise when it comes to the enslavement, oppression, rape, murder, and economic disenfranchisement of an entire race of people perpetuated and perpetrated out of greed for hundreds of years?

Click the link to view the interview:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/31/politics/john-kelly-trump/index.html

Sources:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2017/10/31/politics/john-kelly-trump/index.html

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2017/10/31/politics/john-kelly-trump/index.html

Police Dogs and Anti-Black Violence – AAIHS

Black History: Special Delivery!!

The use of violence as a tool to oppress and subjugate people of color is well documented. Many have seen images of African American protestors during the Civil Rights movement being viciously attacked by dogs. This was not a phenomenon only common to the American Civil Rights Movement. The use of dogs to inflict violence upon people of color is well documented both in the U.S. and abroad. Dogs were often used to inflict punishment on enslaved persons. They were also used to track enslaved persons who ran away. The use of dogs was not ask haphazard. Dogs were specially bred for this purpose.

In an article published by the African American Intellectual Society (AAHIS), Tyler Parry, associate professor at the California State University, Fullerton, candidly shares this troubling and violent history.

Some of our readers may recall the viral video of an African-American man being mauled by a police dog in Florida in July 2017. This incident is also highlighted in the article as well. Click below to view the video. Note the images in the video are disturbing:

Click on the link below to view the article.

http://www.aaihs.org/police-dogs-and-anti-black-violence/

Source: http://www.aaihs.org

54th Anniversary of “I Have A Dream Speech”

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Photo Credit: Library of Congress

August 28, 2017 marks the 54th anniversary of the historic “I Have A Dream Speech” given by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, in Washington, DC during the March on Washington.  More than 200,000 flooded the capital for the historic speech.  Below are some little known facts about the March that you may not know.

  • The March on Washington along with the speech given by Dr. King was said to pressure President Kennedy to approve federal civil rights legislation in Congress.
  • Dr. King was not the “originator” of the “I have a dream” language contained in his speech. It is likely that this language was first used by then 22 year old Prathia Hall after the burning of the Mount Olive Baptist Church in 1962.  King had preached at a church service following the bombing.  Prathia Hall prayed during the service.  During her prayer she shared the “I have a dream” language.  Check out our previous Black Mail post for more information on Prathia Hall.  https://wordpress.com/post/blackmail4u.com/169
  • Originally, the speech was entitled, “Normalcy – Never Again” and did not contain any “I have a dream” wording. Dr. King was encouraged by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson who whispered to him during the speech, “Tell ‘em about the dream Martin.  Tell em’ about the dream.“
  • Dr. King was the last speaker of the day. Many of the march participants, had already left to return to their homes and missed the historic speech.
  • William Sullivan, head of the FBI’s domestic intelligence division wrote a memo after the speech labeling Dr. King “as the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation from the standpoint of communism, the Negro, and national security.”
  • King’s speech, initially did not get much attention in the media. The march itself received most of the media attention.  By the time of King’s death in 1968, the speech, had been largely forgotten.
  • Dr. King first shared, “I have a dream” during a speech in Detroit two months before the March on Washington. Several of his staffers actually tried to discourage him from using the language again.

Check out a video excerpt of the speech:

Source(s):

Blackmail4u.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I47Y6VHc3Ms&feature=yout

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2013/08/i-have-a-dream-speech-facts-trivia.html

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/28/us/mlk-i-have-a-dream-9-things/index.html

1963 – MLK LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


On April 16, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. penned his historic letter from a jail in Birmingham, AL. He initially wrote the letter in the margins of a newspaper, from his jail cell.  

King was intentionally arrested to help garner support for his work in the city.  The letter was written in response to criticism he received from white clergy in Birmingham who openly challenged his approach to fighting segregation through, protests, boycotts, and non violence.  The clergy criticizing King felt that he should operate within the confines of the law to accomplish his goals.  There were also those both black and white that felt King was stirring up trouble that could hinder progress.  King was also criticized for being an “outsider” who was stirring up trouble in the community.  

King eloquently articulated in the letter “why we can’t wait.” In honor of the historic letter, we are sharing two of our favorite quotes contained in the letter. These quotes still ring true today!!  To read the letter in its entirety click here.




Malcolm X Quote: “That’s Not A Chip On My Shoulder. That’s Your Foot On My Neck”

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

Malcolm X.png

A powerful quote from Malcolm X!!

“That’s Not A Chip On My Shoulder.  That’s Your Foot On My Neck” – Malcolm X

Bell Hooks Quote

Black History:  Special Delivery!!


“Usually when people talk about the strength of black women…. they ignore the reality that to be strong in the face of oppression is not the same as overcoming oppression, that endurance is not to be confused with transformation.”
-Bell Hooks


Quote:   Racial “Superiority is a mere ‘PIGMENT’ Of The Imagination”

Black History:  Special Delivery!!



Racial superiority is a mere “PIGMENT” of the imagination.  

~Author Unknown

Red Summer Race Riots of 1919

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

red-summer-riots

James Weldon Johnson, was the first to call the race riots that occurred during the summer of 1919, “Red Summer”.  During this time, race riots broke out across the country due to the growing animosity and tension between blacks and whites.  Riots broke out in Arkansas, Texas, South Carolina, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Washington, DC, Illinois, and Nebraska.  One of the most violent of these riots occurred in Chicago, IL.  Riots occurred in over three dozen cities.  The riot was started when a black teen, floated onto a white beach.  The teen was violently attacked.  From there, the beatings spilled over into white neighborhoods; with blacks passing through these neighborhoods being attacked.  Chicago police did not intervene to stop the attacks.  Blacks then responded by attacking whites that entered their neighborhoods.  It would eventually take a rain storm and the Illinois National Guard to regain order after 5 days.  It would be in Chicago, Washington, DC and Elaine, AK that the largest number of deaths occurred. Continue reading “Red Summer Race Riots of 1919”

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