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Black History: Special Delivery!!

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Black Mail posts historical facts, quotes, and events to inspire, educate, and uplift!

Carter G. Woodson – Quote

Title at top of graphic is Carter G. Woodson - Quote.  Below the title is a picture of Carter G. Woodson. Next to his photo is a quote:  We have a wonderful history behind us...and it is going to inspire us to greater achievements. - Carter G. Woodson

Welcome To Black Mail!

Where we bring you Black History, Special Delivery.

We close out Black History Month with a quote from the Father of Black History Month, Dr. Carter G. Woodson.

“We have a wonderful history behind us…and it is going to inspire us to greater achievements.”

-Dr. Carter G. Woodson

Dr. Woodson is so right! Our history is rich and wonderful, and it will propel present and future generations to higher heights and greater achievements. Thank you for rocking with Black Mail for another month of Black History….Special Delivery!

But, y’all know one month can’t hold our history! We’ll be back!

Julian Bond – Quote

Topic of graphic says, "Julian Bond - Quote"  Below this title to the left is  a photo of Julian Bond and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Next to their photo is the quote, "Good things don't come to those who wait.  They come to those who agitate." -Julian Bond

Welcome To Black Mail!

Where we bring you Black History, Special Delivery.

“Good things don’t come to those who wait. They come to those who agitate!” -Julian Boyd.

What a powerful quote by civil rights activist, politician, and educator Julian Bond. Bond was born in 1940 in Nashville, Tennesse. He met Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr while attending Morehouse College. While at Morehouse, Bond worked with other students to desegregate lunch counters in Atlanta, Georgia. In 1960, he helped establish the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which mobilized students in the fight for civil rights.

Bond was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives from 1967-1975. He also served in the Georgia Senate from 1975-1987. In addition to his political service, Bond served as the first president of the Southern Poverty Law Center from 1971-1979. Following his tenure at the Southern Poverty Law Center, he was president of the Atlanta Chapter of the National Association For The Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) from 1978-1989. He then served as the chairman of the national NAACP from 1998-2010.

Throughout his lifetime, Bond was also a staunch advocate for voting rights. Bond died in 2014 from complications related to vascular disease at the age of 75.

Another installment of melanated mail has been delivered. Ponder, reflect, and pass it on!

The Southern Manifesto: Attempt By Southern Politicians To Maintain Jim Crow Segregation

Top of graphic says, "The Southern Manifesto". Below is a picture of white protestors with picket signs.  Next to the picture are the following words, "In 1956, the House Rules Committee chairman, Howard Smith, announced the Southern Manifesto. Brought forth as an act of defiance, the Manifesto challenged Brown v. Board of Education with the hope of maintaining Jim Crow segregation. "

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On March 12, 1956, the House Rules Committee chairman, Howard Smith, announced the Southern Manifesto in a speech on the House Floor. The document’s formal name was the “Declaration of Constitutional Principles, ” Seventy-seven representatives signed it, and 19 Senators, totaling approximately one-fifth of the membership of Congress, and all from Confederate states. Brought forth as an act of defiance, the Manifesto challenged the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, which outlawed separate school facilities for black and white students.

Continue reading “The Southern Manifesto: Attempt By Southern Politicians To Maintain Jim Crow Segregation”

Dasia Taylor: Black Scientist Who Invented Dye For Sutures To Detect Infection

Top of graphic has the name "Dasia Taylor"  Below the name is a picture of Black scientist and inventor Dasia Taylor.  She is wearing a white lab coat with a black graphic tshirt.  She is wearing glasses.  Next to her photo is the text, "Dasia Taylor is a black scientist and inventor. In 2019 at the age of 15, she developed surgical sutures that change color to indicate to reveal if a wound is healing properly "

Welcome To Black Mail!

Where we bring you Black History, Special Delivery.

Scientist and inventor Dasia Taylor was born on April 6, 2004, in Chicago, Illinois. Taylor graduated from Iowa City West High School in Iowa City, Iowa, in 2021. 

In 2019, at age fifteen, Taylor conducted an experiment with beets. She discovered that dye from beets applied to surgical sutures would change color at a perfect pH point, revealing if a wound was healing properly. When healing correctly, the suture thread (containing beet juice) would change from bright red to dark purple. Cesarean infections were of particular concern for Taylor. In some African nations, as much as 20 percent of women giving birth by c-section experience surgical site infections. 

Continue reading “Dasia Taylor: Black Scientist Who Invented Dye For Sutures To Detect Infection”

Ranch Dressing:  Recipe Invented By Black Rancher Steve Henson

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Where we bring you Black History, Special Delivery.

Picture of Steve and Gayle Henson

Steve Henson (1918-2007) created ranch dressing to compliment the dishes he was serving to his work crews while working as a plumber in Alaska. Upon retirement, Henson and his wife Gayle bought the large 120-acre Sweet Water Ranch in Santa Barbara, California, in 1954. They soon changed the name to Hidden Valley Ranch. Henson brought his recipe, now called “ranch dressing,” to California.

He would serve the tangy blend for guests visiting his ranch. They loved it and often requested bottles to take home. He introduced the recipe to some local businesses near his farm, and it literally flew off the shelves. Soon, Henson sent packets of the dressing around the country, launching a thriving mail-order business. Thus, Hidden Valley Ranch dressing was born! The original seasoning packet required customers to add buttermilk and mayonnaise. 

Continue reading “Ranch Dressing:  Recipe Invented By Black Rancher Steve Henson”

Haben Girma:  First Deafblind Person To Graduate From Harvard Law School

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Where we bring you Black History, Special Delivery.

The graphic contains a picture of Haben Girma and includes the text, "Disability rights advocate, attorney, and author Haben Girma is the first Deafblind person to graduate from Harvard Law School."

Haben Girma was born in Oakland, California, on July 28, 1988. She was born deafblind. Her mother is originally from Eritrea and came to the United States as a refugee in 1983 to escape the Eritrea War of Independence against Ethiopia. Girma’s father is of Ethiopian descent. Her early education took place in Oakland Public Schools. The 1990 passing of the Americans With Disabilities Act supported Girma in receiving an inclusive education. The Americans With Disabilities Act outlawed discrimination based on disability. Girma uses a braille assistive technology device to read.

Continue reading “Haben Girma:  First Deafblind Person To Graduate From Harvard Law School”

Otis F. Boykin:  Black Inventor Of The Wire Precision Resistor

The name "Otis F Boykin" is at the top of the graphic.  Below the name is a picture of Otis Boykin with the words, "Otis Frank Boykin invented the wire precision resistor. His invention significantly reduced the cost of many electronic devices and improved their quality. His inventions impacted electronic devices such as computers and artificial heart pacemakers."

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Where we bring you Black History, Special Delivery.

Black inventor Otis F. Boykin was born in 1920 in Dallas, Texas. His mother died before his first birthday. His father was employed as a carpenter and later became a minister.  Boykin graduated from Fisk University in 1941. While in college, he worked as a laboratory assistant at an aerospace laboratory, testing automatic aircraft controls. Following graduation from Fisk, Boykin was employed as a lab assistant for Majestic Radio and TV Corporation in Chicago, Illinois, and eventually became a supervisor there. In 1944, he began employment with the P.J. Nilsen Research Laboratory. Boykin began graduate studies in 1944 but quickly dropped out because he could not afford the tuition. In 1946, Boykin briefly led his own company, Boykin-Fruth, Inc., where he began developing various inventions. 

Continue reading “Otis F. Boykin:  Black Inventor Of The Wire Precision Resistor”

John F. Pickering:  Black Inventor Of An Air Ship (Blimp)

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On February 20, 1900, Black inventor John F. Pickering (1892-1940) of Gonaives, Haiti, was granted a patent for the “Air Ship. ” (Patent 643,975). Pickering was not the original inventor of the blimp but made some significant improvements to the original design. The first blimp was invented by Henry Giffard in 1852. Pickering’s design was the first blimp with directional controls. It was also powered by an electric motor. In modern times blimps were used for research, tourism, surveying, advertising, freight transportation, camera platforms for sporting events, aerial observation, and military defense. Not much is known about his life.

Another installment of melanated mail has been delivered. Ponder, reflect, and pass it on!

Powell Johnson:  Protective Eyewear Inventor

Top of graphic says "Powell Johnson".  Below name is a picture of his "eye protector" patent.  Next the picture is the following:  In 1880 Black inventor Powell Johnson patented "eye protectors." Johnson designed the eyewear for various professions, including furnacemen, ironworkers, firefighters, and other workers exposed to glare and bright lights. Johnson's design improved upon previous inventions and helped pave the way for modern protective eyewear.  Below this is the website: blackmail4u.com

Welcome To Black Mail!

Where we bring you Black History, Special Delivery.

In 1880 Black inventor Powell Johnson patented “eye protectors.” Johnson designed the eyewear for various professions, including furnacemen, ironworkers, firefighters, and other workers exposed to glare and bright lights. The eye protectors had two frames with cloth disks inserted to shield the eyes from bright light. This type of design was the first of its kind. Johnson’s design improved upon previous inventions and helped pave the way for modern protective eyewear.

Little is known about Johnson’s life. He is credited with developing the first known functional safety-related eyewear.   

.Another installment of melanated mail has been delivered. Ponder, reflect, and pass it on!

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