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Black History: Special Delivery!!

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Black History Month

Location, Location, Location:  The Cost of Racism for Businesses In Black Neighborhoods

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

location

Using data from online consumer business ratings, researchers have now been able to quantify the dollar value impact on revenue growth for businesses located in black neighborhoods.  The research suggests that businesses in black neighborhoods face a negative stigma because of their location within black communities. The stigma centers around businesses being considered as less capable, having less quality, etc.

“Five-star Reviews, One-Star Profits:  The Devaluation of Businesses In Black Communities”  is a new report released by the Brookings Institution on February 18, 2020, looks at businesses in black neighborhoods that are highly rated in online reviews. The research looked at Yelp ratings of businesses. Yelp is an online platform that allows consumers to rate businesses and share feedback. 

According to the Brookings Institution data, businesses in black neighborhoods that are highly rated by customers using the Yelp platform experience a significantly lower rate of revenue growth than businesses not located in black neighborhoods.  The report indicates that the unrealized revenue equates to approximately $3.9 billion in lost revenue annually for businesses with high ratings located in black neighborhoods. According to Brookings Institution lead researcher Andre Perry, “These businesses in black neighborhoods that have high ratings should experience higher revenue growth, but they are not.”  He goes on to also say, “Our model shows that it’s the concentration of blackness in the neighborhood that correlates with the lack of revenue growth. Continue reading “Location, Location, Location:  The Cost of Racism for Businesses In Black Neighborhoods”

Octavia Butler Quote

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Octavia Butler (1947-2006)

Drowning people sometimes die fighting their rescuers.
-Octavia Butler

The Deleted Passage Of The Declaration of Independence That Denounced Slavery

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

declaration of independence

In drafting the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson challenged the inhumanity of slavery.  However, Jefferson enslaved over 600 people throughout his lifetime.  Out of the 600 people he enslaved, he only freed seven.  Jefferson believed that the enslaved were incapable of caring for themselves and therefore should not be freed. He felt that freeing the enslaved would be harmful to them. Continue reading “The Deleted Passage Of The Declaration of Independence That Denounced Slavery”

Harriet Tubman’s Letter of Endorsement From Frederick Douglass

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Harriet Tubman & Frederick Douglass

Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass are perhaps two of the most well-known African Americas of the Civil War time period.  The two shared mutual respect and admiration for one another.  Tubman and Douglass were both born enslaved.  Both lived on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and escaped slavery as young adults; Douglass in 1838 and Tubman in 1849.  After escaping enslavement both sat about, in their own way, to liberate other enslaved peoples. Continue reading “Harriet Tubman’s Letter of Endorsement From Frederick Douglass”

Dr. Jose` Celso Barbosa:  Afro-Puerto Rican, Physician, Political Leader, & Activist

Black History: Special Delivery!!

Dr Jose Barbosa
Dr. Jose`Celos Barbosa (1857-1921)

Dr. Jose`Celso Barbosa (1857-1921) was a trailblazing physician, political leader, and activist. Known as the “father of the Statehood for Puerto Rico movement”. Barbosa was born in the city of Bayamon, Puerto Rico. His parents were of African and European descent. Barbosa received his primary and secondary education at the Jesuit Seminary in Puerto Rico. He was the first person of mixed ancestry to attend. Barbosa was also the first Puerto Rican to earn a medical degree in the United States.

Continue reading “Dr. Jose` Celso Barbosa:  Afro-Puerto Rican, Physician, Political Leader, & Activist”

Anita Scott Coleman:  Harlem Renaissance Author & Poet

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

anita scott coleman
Anita Scott Coleman (1890-1960)

Anita Scott Coleman (1890-1960) was a significant contributor to the Harlem Renaissance.  The Harlem Renaissance (1918-1937) represented a time of social, political and artistic innovation among African Americans.  At the time, it was referred to as the “New Negro Experience”.  Though many of the celebrated artists and artisans of the movement lived in the Harlem area; its impact was both national and international in scope and impact.  Continue reading “Anita Scott Coleman:  Harlem Renaissance Author & Poet”

2020 Marks 60th Anniversary Of Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

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Founded in April 1960 the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) was organized by African American college students to give younger blacks a stronger voice in the civil rights movement. Activist Ella Baker, who was a director with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was credited with organizing students to launch SNCC.  Baker was concerned that SCLC, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was not in sync with younger blacks who sought faster progress in the civil rights movement.  Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others hoped that SNCC would serve as the youth arm of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).  However, SNCC chose to remain independent of SCLC throughout its existence. Continue reading “2020 Marks 60th Anniversary Of Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)”

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf:  1st Woman To Be Elected As President Of An African Country

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

 

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf  

 Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (1938 – present) was the first woman elected as president of an African country when she assumed leadership in Liberia in 2005.  Sirleaf was also one of the recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 for her commitment to advancing women’s rights.

Continue reading “Ellen Johnson Sirleaf:  1st Woman To Be Elected As President Of An African Country”

The African Insurance Company: 1st African American Owned Insurance Company In The U.S.

Black History:  Special Delivery!!

The African Insurance Company was launched in 1850, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Joseph Randolph served as its first president.  The establishment of an insurance company by African Americans was a natural progression from mutual aid societies that had emerged just after the American Revolution.  It was modeled after the Free African Society which was established in 1787.  The African Insurance Company sought to address the needs of Philadelphia’s growing population of African American residents.

The company was in business for just three years, closing in 1813.  It struggled in building its customer base.  Despite its short existence, The African Insurance Company was seen as a role model for black insurance companies founded after the Civil War.

Sources:

https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/african-insurance-company-1810-1813/

https://blackthen.com/established-in-1810-the-african-insurance-company-was-the-first-african-american-owned-in-the-us/

Du Bois, W.E.B., “Economic Co-operation among Negro Americans”, http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/dubois07/dubois.html##dub92.

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